IELTS TESTLERİ

IELTS TESTLERİ



(2) Throughout the ages leprosy has been one of the most dreaded diseases and its victims the most shunned. Almost all cultures have believed that persons who contracted leprosy were spiritually unclean. In modern times the disease has still retained some of its mythical character, and many people do not realize that leprosy is a disease that is only mildly contagious and not fatal. In the early 1980s the World Health Organization estimated that more than 11 million people had leprosy. Leprosy is caused by a rod-shaped bacterium, Mycobacterium leprae, a relative of the tuberculosis bacillus. The organism was identified in 1874 by Armauer Hansen, a Norwegian physician, and an alternative name for leprosy is Hansen's disease. The infection is very slow to develop, ranging from six months to ten years, and children are much more susceptible than adults. (14) There are two main types of reaction to M. leprae in the body. In the milder form of the disease, tuberculoid leprosy, the body's cells crowd around the invading organisms in the deep skin layers, which are the first areas of infection. This response sometimes seals off the infection from the rest of the body or at least limits its spread. The reaction, however, destroys hair follicles, sweat glands, and nerve endings at the site of infection. The skin above the site becomes dry and discolored and loses its sense of touch. Fingers and toes that have no feeling are easily injured, and, if the patient has not been trained to take protective measures, they may in time become mutilated and fall off. In the second and more contagious form of the disease, lepromatous leprosy, the body is not able to mount a resistance, and the M. leprae multiply freely in the skin. Large, soft bumps, or nodules, appear over the body and face. Mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and throat may be , invaded.     Mark the best choice       1. What does dreaded (Line 1) mean?





(2) Throughout the ages leprosy has been one of the most dreaded diseases and its victims the most shunned. Almost all cultures have believed that persons who contracted leprosy were spiritually unclean. In modern times the disease has still retained some of its mythical character, and many people do not realize that leprosy is a disease that is only mildly contagious and not fatal. In the early 1980s the World Health Organization estimated that more than 11 million people had leprosy. Leprosy is caused by a rod-shaped bacterium, Mycobacterium leprae, a relative of the tuberculosis bacillus. The organism was identified in 1874 by Armauer Hansen, a Norwegian physician, and an alternative name for leprosy is Hansen's disease. The infection is very slow to develop, ranging from six months to ten years, and children are much more susceptible than adults. (14) There are two main types of reaction to M. leprae in the body. In the milder form of the disease, tuberculoid leprosy, the body's cells crowd around the invading organisms in the deep skin layers, which are the first areas of infection. This response sometimes seals off the infection from the rest of the body or at least limits its spread. The reaction, however, destroys hair follicles, sweat glands, and nerve endings at the site of infection. The skin above the site becomes dry and discolored and loses its sense of touch. Fingers and toes that have no feeling are easily injured, and, if the patient has not been trained to take protective measures, they may in time become mutilated and fall off. In the second and more contagious form of the disease, lepromatous leprosy, the body is not able to mount a resistance, and the M. leprae multiply freely in the skin. Large, soft bumps, or nodules, appear over the body and face. Mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and throat may be , invaded.     Mark the best choice     2. What does shunned (Line 2) mean?  





(2) Throughout the ages leprosy has been one of the most dreaded diseases and its victims the most shunned. Almost all cultures have believed that persons who contracted leprosy were spiritually unclean. In modern times the disease has still retained some of its mythical character, and many people do not realize that leprosy is a disease that is only mildly contagious and not fatal. In the early 1980s the World Health Organization estimated that more than 11 million people had leprosy. Leprosy is caused by a rod-shaped bacterium, Mycobacterium leprae, a relative of the tuberculosis bacillus. The organism was identified in 1874 by Armauer Hansen, a Norwegian physician, and an alternative name for leprosy is Hansen's disease. The infection is very slow to develop, ranging from six months to ten years, and children are much more susceptible than adults. (14) There are two main types of reaction to M. leprae in the body. In the milder form of the disease, tuberculoid leprosy, the body's cells crowd around the invading organisms in the deep skin layers, which are the first areas of infection. This response sometimes seals off the infection from the rest of the body or at least limits its spread. The reaction, however, destroys hair follicles, sweat glands, and nerve endings at the site of infection. The skin above the site becomes dry and discolored and loses its sense of touch. Fingers and toes that have no feeling are easily injured, and, if the patient has not been trained to take protective measures, they may in time become mutilated and fall off. In the second and more contagious form of the disease, lepromatous leprosy, the body is not able to mount a resistance, and the M. leprae multiply freely in the skin. Large, soft bumps, or nodules, appear over the body and face. Mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and throat may be , invaded.     Mark the best choice   3. What is one belief about leprosy that all cultures seem to share?  





(2) Throughout the ages leprosy has been one of the most dreaded diseases and its victims the most shunned. Almost all cultures have believed that persons who contracted leprosy were spiritually unclean. In modern times the disease has still retained some of its mythical character, and many people do not realize that leprosy is a disease that is only mildly contagious and not fatal. In the early 1980s the World Health Organization estimated that more than 11 million people had leprosy. Leprosy is caused by a rod-shaped bacterium, Mycobacterium leprae, a relative of the tuberculosis bacillus. The organism was identified in 1874 by Armauer Hansen, a Norwegian physician, and an alternative name for leprosy is Hansen's disease. The infection is very slow to develop, ranging from six months to ten years, and children are much more susceptible than adults. (14) There are two main types of reaction to M. leprae in the body. In the milder form of the disease, tuberculoid leprosy, the body's cells crowd around the invading organisms in the deep skin layers, which are the first areas of infection. This response sometimes seals off the infection from the rest of the body or at least limits its spread. The reaction, however, destroys hair follicles, sweat glands, and nerve endings at the site of infection. The skin above the site becomes dry and discolored and loses its sense of touch. Fingers and toes that have no feeling are easily injured, and, if the patient has not been trained to take protective measures, they may in time become mutilated and fall off. In the second and more contagious form of the disease, lepromatous leprosy, the body is not able to mount a resistance, and the M. leprae multiply freely in the skin. Large, soft bumps, or nodules, appear over the body and face. Mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and throat may be , invaded.     Mark the best choice       4. According to modern medicine, Leprosy __________.





(2) Throughout the ages leprosy has been one of the most dreaded diseases and its victims the most shunned. Almost all cultures have believed that persons who contracted leprosy were spiritually unclean. In modern times the disease has still retained some of its mythical character, and many people do not realize that leprosy is a disease that is only mildly contagious and not fatal. In the early 1980s the World Health Organization estimated that more than 11 million people had leprosy. Leprosy is caused by a rod-shaped bacterium, Mycobacterium leprae, a relative of the tuberculosis bacillus. The organism was identified in 1874 by Armauer Hansen, a Norwegian physician, and an alternative name for leprosy is Hansen's disease. The infection is very slow to develop, ranging from six months to ten years, and children are much more susceptible than adults. (14) There are two main types of reaction to M. leprae in the body. In the milder form of the disease, tuberculoid leprosy, the body's cells crowd around the invading organisms in the deep skin layers, which are the first areas of infection. This response sometimes seals off the infection from the rest of the body or at least limits its spread. The reaction, however, destroys hair follicles, sweat glands, and nerve endings at the site of infection. The skin above the site becomes dry and discolored and loses its sense of touch. Fingers and toes that have no feeling are easily injured, and, if the patient has not been trained to take protective measures, they may in time become mutilated and fall off. In the second and more contagious form of the disease, lepromatous leprosy, the body is not able to mount a resistance, and the M. leprae multiply freely in the skin. Large, soft bumps, or nodules, appear over the body and face. Mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and throat may be , invaded.     Mark the best choice         5. What causes leprosy?







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