İNGİLİZCE OKUMA PARÇASI

İNGİLİZCE OKUMA PARÇASI



David Thomson is an electronics technician, trained by the U.S. Navy, who writes instruction books for complicated equipment. He is convinced that every person is surrounded by a force field that can broadcast emotions to other human beings. The ability to receive such force fields, Thomson believes, explains how one can sense another's fear, nervousness, aggression, panic, or friendliness. This theory of emotional communication occurred to Thomson when he told a psychiatrist, Dr. Jack Ward, that he was certain his own hypertension made those near him uncomfortable. To demonstrate the theory, Thomson constructed a transmitter capable of generating an electromagnetic field similar to that of a man beset by hyperanxiety. For a year, with this in his pocket, Thomson made people miserable. He would find a hungry man delightedly preparing to eat a steak in a restaurant, turn on the transmitter, and watch as the man became tense and irritable and finally left with his steak uneaten. In another test, Thomson cleared a crowded room in fifteen minutes. Such an exodus could not be due, Thomson observed, to personality problems alone. Dr. Ward, who had become Thomson's partner, insisted that there was already misery enough in the world. Thomson fashioned a ''happiness transmitter," which can duplicate the force field of a contented man. University psychologists in the United States report some encouraging results in current tests of the Thomson-and-Ward transmitter. The "happiness machine" has many possibilities. Thomson has speculated on its use near disturbed or anxious patients in hospitals, and in unruly crowds. Tranquillity, like panic and violence, may be contagious.   Mark the best choice         1. The theory described in this selection was developed by __________.





David Thomson is an electronics technician, trained by the U.S. Navy, who writes instruction books for complicated equipment. He is convinced that every person is surrounded by a force field that can broadcast emotions to other human beings. The ability to receive such force fields, Thomson believes, explains how one can sense another's fear, nervousness, aggression, panic, or friendliness. This theory of emotional communication occurred to Thomson when he told a psychiatrist, Dr. Jack Ward, that he was certain his own hypertension made those near him uncomfortable. To demonstrate the theory, Thomson constructed a transmitter capable of generating an electromagnetic field similar to that of a man beset by hyperanxiety. For a year, with this in his pocket, Thomson made people miserable. He would find a hungry man delightedly preparing to eat a steak in a restaurant, turn on the transmitter, and watch as the man became tense and irritable and finally left with his steak uneaten. In another test, Thomson cleared a crowded room in fifteen minutes. Such an exodus could not be due, Thomson observed, to personality problems alone. Dr. Ward, who had become Thomson's partner, insisted that there was already misery enough in the world. Thomson fashioned a ''happiness transmitter," which can duplicate the force field of a contented man. University psychologists in the United States report some encouraging results in current tests of the Thomson-and-Ward transmitter. The "happiness machine" has many possibilities. Thomson has speculated on its use near disturbed or anxious patients in hospitals, and in unruly crowds. Tranquillity, like panic and violence, may be contagious.   Mark the best choice          2.   The theory is based on belief in the existence of __________.  





David Thomson is an electronics technician, trained by the U.S. Navy, who writes instruction books for complicated equipment. He is convinced that every person is surrounded by a force field that can broadcast emotions to other human beings. The ability to receive such force fields, Thomson believes, explains how one can sense another's fear, nervousness, aggression, panic, or friendliness. This theory of emotional communication occurred to Thomson when he told a psychiatrist, Dr. Jack Ward, that he was certain his own hypertension made those near him uncomfortable. To demonstrate the theory, Thomson constructed a transmitter capable of generating an electromagnetic field similar to that of a man beset by hyperanxiety. For a year, with this in his pocket, Thomson made people miserable. He would find a hungry man delightedly preparing to eat a steak in a restaurant, turn on the transmitter, and watch as the man became tense and irritable and finally left with his steak uneaten. In another test, Thomson cleared a crowded room in fifteen minutes. Such an exodus could not be due, Thomson observed, to personality problems alone. Dr. Ward, who had become Thomson's partner, insisted that there was already misery enough in the world. Thomson fashioned a ''happiness transmitter," which can duplicate the force field of a contented man. University psychologists in the United States report some encouraging results in current tests of the Thomson-and-Ward transmitter. The "happiness machine" has many possibilities. Thomson has speculated on its use near disturbed or anxious patients in hospitals, and in unruly crowds. Tranquillity, like panic and violence, may be contagious.   Mark the best choice            3.   The theory occurred to Thomson because he was convinced that people near him __________.  





David Thomson is an electronics technician, trained by the U.S. Navy, who writes instruction books for complicated equipment. He is convinced that every person is surrounded by a force field that can broadcast emotions to other human beings. The ability to receive such force fields, Thomson believes, explains how one can sense another's fear, nervousness, aggression, panic, or friendliness. This theory of emotional communication occurred to Thomson when he told a psychiatrist, Dr. Jack Ward, that he was certain his own hypertension made those near him uncomfortable. To demonstrate the theory, Thomson constructed a transmitter capable of generating an electromagnetic field similar to that of a man beset by hyperanxiety. For a year, with this in his pocket, Thomson made people miserable. He would find a hungry man delightedly preparing to eat a steak in a restaurant, turn on the transmitter, and watch as the man became tense and irritable and finally left with his steak uneaten. In another test, Thomson cleared a crowded room in fifteen minutes. Such an exodus could not be due, Thomson observed, to personality problems alone. Dr. Ward, who had become Thomson's partner, insisted that there was already misery enough in the world. Thomson fashioned a ''happiness transmitter," which can duplicate the force field of a contented man. University psychologists in the United States report some encouraging results in current tests of the Thomson-and-Ward transmitter. The "happiness machine" has many possibilities. Thomson has speculated on its use near disturbed or anxious patients in hospitals, and in unruly crowds. Tranquillity, like panic and violence, may be contagious.   Mark the best choice               4.   The transmitter used to demonstrate the theory is described as producing __________.  





David Thomson is an electronics technician, trained by the U.S. Navy, who writes instruction books for complicated equipment. He is convinced that every person is surrounded by a force field that can broadcast emotions to other human beings. The ability to receive such force fields, Thomson believes, explains how one can sense another's fear, nervousness, aggression, panic, or friendliness. This theory of emotional communication occurred to Thomson when he told a psychiatrist, Dr. Jack Ward, that he was certain his own hypertension made those near him uncomfortable. To demonstrate the theory, Thomson constructed a transmitter capable of generating an electromagnetic field similar to that of a man beset by hyperanxiety. For a year, with this in his pocket, Thomson made people miserable. He would find a hungry man delightedly preparing to eat a steak in a restaurant, turn on the transmitter, and watch as the man became tense and irritable and finally left with his steak uneaten. In another test, Thomson cleared a crowded room in fifteen minutes. Such an exodus could not be due, Thomson observed, to personality problems alone. Dr. Ward, who had become Thomson's partner, insisted that there was already misery enough in the world. Thomson fashioned a ''happiness transmitter," which can duplicate the force field of a contented man. University psychologists in the United States report some encouraging results in current tests of the Thomson-and-Ward transmitter. The "happiness machine" has many possibilities. Thomson has speculated on its use near disturbed or anxious patients in hospitals, and in unruly crowds. Tranquillity, like panic and violence, may be contagious.   Mark the best choice              5.   For his first demonstrations, Thomson check people who __________.    







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