İNGİLİZCE TOEFL SORULARI

İNGİLİZCE TOEFL SORULARI



Eskimo, the mother tongue of 100,000 natives in Greenland, Alaska and Canada, is struggling for survival. It is the language heard on hunting expeditions, in churches, and in town halls across the Atlantic. In Canada, sixty-seven percent of Eskimos speak mainly in their native tongue called Inuktitut at home among family members, but the invasion of English via television, music tapes, magazines, employers, and tourists is eroding the Eskimo's linguistic soul. TV satellites and computers are accelerating the change. The Eskimo language fascinates linguists. They classify it as a 'polysynthetic' language. In other words, the Eskimo language names things and expresses concepts by collating long strings of ideas or words into a single word. For example, gangattaqtitausmajing - satellite - is literally 'it has been made to fly'. The language is also known for its vocabulary rich in words rooted in the environment. When an Eskimo says 'I'm going hunting', the verb he uses depends on whether he is hunting seal, bear, or some other animal. Those who love the language say polysynthetic could save it. "The Eskimo language is very resilient. That is to say, it can very quickly return to its previous condition," said Mr. Ken Harper, a Canadian linguist. "It has borrowed a lot of words from English but it isn't necessary. It can easily form its own words." In Danish Greenland, they are doing precisely that. Under the Eskimo-dominated local government, a special Greenland Language Commission is safeguarding the language against be powerful attack of Danish and English by collecting, recording, and, when necessary, manufacturing Eskimo words. Mr. Harper sees another sign of hope for Eskimo: "The technology that threatened the culture before is now helping." An American company has devised a word-processor keyboard in the Canadian Eskimo alphabet, syllabics, allowing publication of the weekly Nunatsiaq News. In other words, the qarasaasiaq — 'little artificial brain' — is becoming increasingly user-friendly.                         Mark the best choice.   1. Which of the following is TRUE according to the text?      





Eskimo, the mother tongue of 100,000 natives in Greenland, Alaska and Canada, is struggling for survival. It is the language heard on hunting expeditions, in churches, and in town halls across the Atlantic. In Canada, sixty-seven percent of Eskimos speak mainly in their native tongue called Inuktitut at home among family members, but the invasion of English via television, music tapes, magazines, employers, and tourists is eroding the Eskimo's linguistic soul. TV satellites and computers are accelerating the change. The Eskimo language fascinates linguists. They classify it as a 'polysynthetic' language. In other words, the Eskimo language names things and expresses concepts by collating long strings of ideas or words into a single word. For example, gangattaqtitausmajing - satellite - is literally 'it has been made to fly'. The language is also known for its vocabulary rich in words rooted in the environment. When an Eskimo says 'I'm going hunting', the verb he uses depends on whether he is hunting seal, bear, or some other animal. Those who love the language say polysynthetic could save it. "The Eskimo language is very resilient. That is to say, it can very quickly return to its previous condition," said Mr. Ken Harper, a Canadian linguist. "It has borrowed a lot of words from English but it isn't necessary. It can easily form its own words." In Danish Greenland, they are doing precisely that. Under the Eskimo-dominated local government, a special Greenland Language Commission is safeguarding the language against be powerful attack of Danish and English by collecting, recording, and, when necessary, manufacturing Eskimo words. Mr. Harper sees another sign of hope for Eskimo: "The technology that threatened the culture before is now helping." An American company has devised a word-processor keyboard in the Canadian Eskimo alphabet, syllabics, allowing publication of the weekly Nunatsiaq News. In other words, the qarasaasiaq — 'little artificial brain' — is becoming increasingly user-friendly.                         Mark the best choice.         2. The Eskimo word for satellite __________.





Eskimo, the mother tongue of 100,000 natives in Greenland, Alaska and Canada, is struggling for survival. It is the language heard on hunting expeditions, in churches, and in town halls across the Atlantic. In Canada, sixty-seven percent of Eskimos speak mainly in their native tongue called Inuktitut at home among family members, but the invasion of English via television, music tapes, magazines, employers, and tourists is eroding the Eskimo's linguistic soul. TV satellites and computers are accelerating the change. The Eskimo language fascinates linguists. They classify it as a 'polysynthetic' language. In other words, the Eskimo language names things and expresses concepts by collating long strings of ideas or words into a single word. For example, gangattaqtitausmajing - satellite - is literally 'it has been made to fly'. The language is also known for its vocabulary rich in words rooted in the environment. When an Eskimo says 'I'm going hunting', the verb he uses depends on whether he is hunting seal, bear, or some other animal. Those who love the language say polysynthetic could save it. "The Eskimo language is very resilient. That is to say, it can very quickly return to its previous condition," said Mr. Ken Harper, a Canadian linguist. "It has borrowed a lot of words from English but it isn't necessary. It can easily form its own words." In Danish Greenland, they are doing precisely that. Under the Eskimo-dominated local government, a special Greenland Language Commission is safeguarding the language against be powerful attack of Danish and English by collecting, recording, and, when necessary, manufacturing Eskimo words. Mr. Harper sees another sign of hope for Eskimo: "The technology that threatened the culture before is now helping." An American company has devised a word-processor keyboard in the Canadian Eskimo alphabet, syllabics, allowing publication of the weekly Nunatsiaq News. In other words, the qarasaasiaq — 'little artificial brain' — is becoming increasingly user-friendly.                         Mark the best choice.       3. According to the text, the Eskimo language __________.  





Eskimo, the mother tongue of 100,000 natives in Greenland, Alaska and Canada, is struggling for survival. It is the language heard on hunting expeditions, in churches, and in town halls across the Atlantic. In Canada, sixty-seven percent of Eskimos speak mainly in their native tongue called Inuktitut at home among family members, but the invasion of English via television, music tapes, magazines, employers, and tourists is eroding the Eskimo's linguistic soul. TV satellites and computers are accelerating the change. The Eskimo language fascinates linguists. They classify it as a 'polysynthetic' language. In other words, the Eskimo language names things and expresses concepts by collating long strings of ideas or words into a single word. For example, gangattaqtitausmajing - satellite - is literally 'it has been made to fly'. The language is also known for its vocabulary rich in words rooted in the environment. When an Eskimo says 'I'm going hunting', the verb he uses depends on whether he is hunting seal, bear, or some other animal. Those who love the language say polysynthetic could save it. "The Eskimo language is very resilient. That is to say, it can very quickly return to its previous condition," said Mr. Ken Harper, a Canadian linguist. "It has borrowed a lot of words from English but it isn't necessary. It can easily form its own words." In Danish Greenland, they are doing precisely that. Under the Eskimo-dominated local government, a special Greenland Language Commission is safeguarding the language against be powerful attack of Danish and English by collecting, recording, and, when necessary, manufacturing Eskimo words. Mr. Harper sees another sign of hope for Eskimo: "The technology that threatened the culture before is now helping." An American company has devised a word-processor keyboard in the Canadian Eskimo alphabet, syllabics, allowing publication of the weekly Nunatsiaq News. In other words, the qarasaasiaq — 'little artificial brain' — is becoming increasingly user-friendly.                         Mark the best choice.         4.  In Greenland, the Language Commission __________.  





Eskimo, the mother tongue of 100,000 natives in Greenland, Alaska and Canada, is struggling for survival. It is the language heard on hunting expeditions, in churches, and in town halls across the Atlantic. In Canada, sixty-seven percent of Eskimos speak mainly in their native tongue called Inuktitut at home among family members, but the invasion of English via television, music tapes, magazines, employers, and tourists is eroding the Eskimo's linguistic soul. TV satellites and computers are accelerating the change. The Eskimo language fascinates linguists. They classify it as a 'polysynthetic' language. In other words, the Eskimo language names things and expresses concepts by collating long strings of ideas or words into a single word. For example, gangattaqtitausmajing - satellite - is literally 'it has been made to fly'. The language is also known for its vocabulary rich in words rooted in the environment. When an Eskimo says 'I'm going hunting', the verb he uses depends on whether he is hunting seal, bear, or some other animal. Those who love the language say polysynthetic could save it. "The Eskimo language is very resilient. That is to say, it can very quickly return to its previous condition," said Mr. Ken Harper, a Canadian linguist. "It has borrowed a lot of words from English but it isn't necessary. It can easily form its own words." In Danish Greenland, they are doing precisely that. Under the Eskimo-dominated local government, a special Greenland Language Commission is safeguarding the language against be powerful attack of Danish and English by collecting, recording, and, when necessary, manufacturing Eskimo words. Mr. Harper sees another sign of hope for Eskimo: "The technology that threatened the culture before is now helping." An American company has devised a word-processor keyboard in the Canadian Eskimo alphabet, syllabics, allowing publication of the weekly Nunatsiaq News. In other words, the qarasaasiaq — 'little artificial brain' — is becoming increasingly user-friendly.                         Mark the best choice.       5. The development of a word-processor keyboard in syllables __________.  







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