SORU VE CEVAPLAR

SORU VE CEVAPLAR



The story of the Plimsoll mark is an exciting chapter in the history of British' navigation. In 1870 Samuel Plimsoll, a Member of Parliament, became interested in seamen's safety. At that time there were no inspections for seaworthiness, and ships often went to sea with leaky bottoms, rotten spars, worn-out rigging, and boilers covered with rust. Worse, ship owners greedy for quick profits would order their vessels loaded with cargoes so heavy that the upper decks were forced down to the water's edge. When such a ship encountered heavy seas, only a miracle could save it. Plimsoll began his crusade against these deplorable practices by presenting in Parliament a bill requiring ship owners to mark their ships with a safety-load line. The measure was defeated. Undaunted, he introduced the bill repeatedly, only to have it rejected every time. At last, however, popular feeling was aroused, and in 1876 the Board of Trade was authorized to inspect all outward-bound ships. Of the 286 checked during the following nine months, 256 were declared unfit for ocean travel, and one of every ten was so dangerously overloaded that it was practically sinking at the wharfside. Finally, in 1890, Parliament ruled that a Plimsoll mark be painted on every British ship. The mark, a circular disk 12 inches in diameter with an 18-inch-long horizontal bar drawn through its center, indicated the depth to which a vessel could be safely loaded. Today every ship carries this symbol — a tribute to Samuel Plimsoll's concern and perseverance. Mark the best choice     1.   Proof that Plimsoll's concern was justified came in __________.





The story of the Plimsoll mark is an exciting chapter in the history of British' navigation. In 1870 Samuel Plimsoll, a Member of Parliament, became interested in seamen's safety. At that time there were no inspections for seaworthiness, and ships often went to sea with leaky bottoms, rotten spars, worn-out rigging, and boilers covered with rust. Worse, ship owners greedy for quick profits would order their vessels loaded with cargoes so heavy that the upper decks were forced down to the water's edge. When such a ship encountered heavy seas, only a miracle could save it. Plimsoll began his crusade against these deplorable practices by presenting in Parliament a bill requiring ship owners to mark their ships with a safety-load line. The measure was defeated. Undaunted, he introduced the bill repeatedly, only to have it rejected every time. At last, however, popular feeling was aroused, and in 1876 the Board of Trade was authorized to inspect all outward-bound ships. Of the 286 checked during the following nine months, 256 were declared unfit for ocean travel, and one of every ten was so dangerously overloaded that it was practically sinking at the wharfside. Finally, in 1890, Parliament ruled that a Plimsoll mark be painted on every British ship. The mark, a circular disk 12 inches in diameter with an 18-inch-long horizontal bar drawn through its center, indicated the depth to which a vessel could be safely loaded. Today every ship carries this symbol — a tribute to Samuel Plimsoll's concern and perseverance. Mark the best choice         2.The account says that when the Board of Trade declared many ships unfit to travel, the result was that __________.





The story of the Plimsoll mark is an exciting chapter in the history of British' navigation. In 1870 Samuel Plimsoll, a Member of Parliament, became interested in seamen's safety. At that time there were no inspections for seaworthiness, and ships often went to sea with leaky bottoms, rotten spars, worn-out rigging, and boilers covered with rust. Worse, ship owners greedy for quick profits would order their vessels loaded with cargoes so heavy that the upper decks were forced down to the water's edge. When such a ship encountered heavy seas, only a miracle could save it. Plimsoll began his crusade against these deplorable practices by presenting in Parliament a bill requiring ship owners to mark their ships with a safety-load line. The measure was defeated. Undaunted, he introduced the bill repeatedly, only to have it rejected every time. At last, however, popular feeling was aroused, and in 1876 the Board of Trade was authorized to inspect all outward-bound ships. Of the 286 checked during the following nine months, 256 were declared unfit for ocean travel, and one of every ten was so dangerously overloaded that it was practically sinking at the wharfside. Finally, in 1890, Parliament ruled that a Plimsoll mark be painted on every British ship. The mark, a circular disk 12 inches in diameter with an 18-inch-long horizontal bar drawn through its center, indicated the depth to which a vessel could be safely loaded. Today every ship carries this symbol — a tribute to Samuel Plimsoll's concern and perseverance. Mark the best choice     3.   The Plimsoll mark __________.







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