TOEFL SORULARI

TOEFL SORULARI



As the water reached her waist Helen felt herself starting to panic. It was ridiculous, she told herself. Here she was a fully grown woman wearing armbands and a buoyancy aid around her waist and grasping a float. But she was still terrified of water. At 43, and married with two children, Helen was deeply ashamed of the fact she couldn't swim. She hadn't had swimming lessons at school as there had been no facilities. As she'd got older, her natural distrust of water turned into a phobia. "I was okay as long as my feet were touching the bottom, but the moment I floated free, I'd panic. My heart began racing, my stomach would tighten and I couldn't bear anybody near me." In 1975 when she enrolled for lessons at her local swimming pool it was a disaster. The instructor did get her to do a few strokes but she remained absolutely terrified. When her two children - Daniel, now 19 and Laura, 17 - were young, Helen tried again but her progress was slow and she soon gave in, thinking there was no point carrying on. And that was exactly how things would have stayed if it hadn't been for the Splash school of swimming in Leeds, near Helen's home. When one of the school's leaflets dropped through her letterbox one day last March, Helen was inspired to give swimming one more go. "In the past, whenever I said I was starting lessons the whole family would say "Oh no, not again" so this time I didn't tell anybody. I just phoned up Splash and booked a course." At first Helen was as scared as ever but gradually, with the teacher's help, she began to make progress. The school taught Helen as part of a small group and the instructors stayed in the water with her. They were very patient and that was what she needed. Other instructors at other schools had bullied her and so she'd become discouraged. At Splash, however, they were very understanding. After a few months, Helen was able to take off the armbands and started going to another class at her local sports centre. Soon she could swim a whole length of the swimming pool. Then, just when things were looking up and Helen was able to swim half a dozen lengths, she suddenly lost her nerve again. One day, out of the blue, she had a panic attack and started shaking and shivering with fear. Determined not to let this defeat her after she'd come so far, Helen went to a hypnotherapist who gave her subconscious suggestions to help her overcome her fears. She was soon back in the water with renewed assurance. And now Helen can swim 64 lengths of her local swimming pool, which is much more than a mile. To celebrate her success she hired the pool at her local sports centre for a birthday celebration. Helen shows the rest of us anything can be achieved if you want to do it badly enough.  Mark the best choice         1. Helen knew that her fear was __________.





As the water reached her waist Helen felt herself starting to panic. It was ridiculous, she told herself. Here she was a fully grown woman wearing armbands and a buoyancy aid around her waist and grasping a float. But she was still terrified of water. At 43, and married with two children, Helen was deeply ashamed of the fact she couldn't swim. She hadn't had swimming lessons at school as there had been no facilities. As she'd got older, her natural distrust of water turned into a phobia. "I was okay as long as my feet were touching the bottom, but the moment I floated free, I'd panic. My heart began racing, my stomach would tighten and I couldn't bear anybody near me." In 1975 when she enrolled for lessons at her local swimming pool it was a disaster. The instructor did get her to do a few strokes but she remained absolutely terrified. When her two children - Daniel, now 19 and Laura, 17 - were young, Helen tried again but her progress was slow and she soon gave in, thinking there was no point carrying on. And that was exactly how things would have stayed if it hadn't been for the Splash school of swimming in Leeds, near Helen's home. When one of the school's leaflets dropped through her letterbox one day last March, Helen was inspired to give swimming one more go. "In the past, whenever I said I was starting lessons the whole family would say "Oh no, not again" so this time I didn't tell anybody. I just phoned up Splash and booked a course." At first Helen was as scared as ever but gradually, with the teacher's help, she began to make progress. The school taught Helen as part of a small group and the instructors stayed in the water with her. They were very patient and that was what she needed. Other instructors at other schools had bullied her and so she'd become discouraged. At Splash, however, they were very understanding. After a few months, Helen was able to take off the armbands and started going to another class at her local sports centre. Soon she could swim a whole length of the swimming pool. Then, just when things were looking up and Helen was able to swim half a dozen lengths, she suddenly lost her nerve again. One day, out of the blue, she had a panic attack and started shaking and shivering with fear. Determined not to let this defeat her after she'd come so far, Helen went to a hypnotherapist who gave her subconscious suggestions to help her overcome her fears. She was soon back in the water with renewed assurance. And now Helen can swim 64 lengths of her local swimming pool, which is much more than a mile. To celebrate her success she hired the pool at her local sports centre for a birthday celebration. Helen shows the rest of us anything can be achieved if you want to do it badly enough.  Mark the best choice     2. Why hadn't Helen learnt to swim?  





As the water reached her waist Helen felt herself starting to panic. It was ridiculous, she told herself. Here she was a fully grown woman wearing armbands and a buoyancy aid around her waist and grasping a float. But she was still terrified of water. At 43, and married with two children, Helen was deeply ashamed of the fact she couldn't swim. She hadn't had swimming lessons at school as there had been no facilities. As she'd got older, her natural distrust of water turned into a phobia. "I was okay as long as my feet were touching the bottom, but the moment I floated free, I'd panic. My heart began racing, my stomach would tighten and I couldn't bear anybody near me." In 1975 when she enrolled for lessons at her local swimming pool it was a disaster. The instructor did get her to do a few strokes but she remained absolutely terrified. When her two children - Daniel, now 19 and Laura, 17 - were young, Helen tried again but her progress was slow and she soon gave in, thinking there was no point carrying on. And that was exactly how things would have stayed if it hadn't been for the Splash school of swimming in Leeds, near Helen's home. When one of the school's leaflets dropped through her letterbox one day last March, Helen was inspired to give swimming one more go. "In the past, whenever I said I was starting lessons the whole family would say "Oh no, not again" so this time I didn't tell anybody. I just phoned up Splash and booked a course." At first Helen was as scared as ever but gradually, with the teacher's help, she began to make progress. The school taught Helen as part of a small group and the instructors stayed in the water with her. They were very patient and that was what she needed. Other instructors at other schools had bullied her and so she'd become discouraged. At Splash, however, they were very understanding. After a few months, Helen was able to take off the armbands and started going to another class at her local sports centre. Soon she could swim a whole length of the swimming pool. Then, just when things were looking up and Helen was able to swim half a dozen lengths, she suddenly lost her nerve again. One day, out of the blue, she had a panic attack and started shaking and shivering with fear. Determined not to let this defeat her after she'd come so far, Helen went to a hypnotherapist who gave her subconscious suggestions to help her overcome her fears. She was soon back in the water with renewed assurance. And now Helen can swim 64 lengths of her local swimming pool, which is much more than a mile. To celebrate her success she hired the pool at her local sports centre for a birthday celebration. Helen shows the rest of us anything can be achieved if you want to do it badly enough.  Mark the best choice         3. What happened the first time Helen had lessons?





As the water reached her waist Helen felt herself starting to panic. It was ridiculous, she told herself. Here she was a fully grown woman wearing armbands and a buoyancy aid around her waist and grasping a float. But she was still terrified of water. At 43, and married with two children, Helen was deeply ashamed of the fact she couldn't swim. She hadn't had swimming lessons at school as there had been no facilities. As she'd got older, her natural distrust of water turned into a phobia. "I was okay as long as my feet were touching the bottom, but the moment I floated free, I'd panic. My heart began racing, my stomach would tighten and I couldn't bear anybody near me." In 1975 when she enrolled for lessons at her local swimming pool it was a disaster. The instructor did get her to do a few strokes but she remained absolutely terrified. When her two children - Daniel, now 19 and Laura, 17 - were young, Helen tried again but her progress was slow and she soon gave in, thinking there was no point carrying on. And that was exactly how things would have stayed if it hadn't been for the Splash school of swimming in Leeds, near Helen's home. When one of the school's leaflets dropped through her letterbox one day last March, Helen was inspired to give swimming one more go. "In the past, whenever I said I was starting lessons the whole family would say "Oh no, not again" so this time I didn't tell anybody. I just phoned up Splash and booked a course." At first Helen was as scared as ever but gradually, with the teacher's help, she began to make progress. The school taught Helen as part of a small group and the instructors stayed in the water with her. They were very patient and that was what she needed. Other instructors at other schools had bullied her and so she'd become discouraged. At Splash, however, they were very understanding. After a few months, Helen was able to take off the armbands and started going to another class at her local sports centre. Soon she could swim a whole length of the swimming pool. Then, just when things were looking up and Helen was able to swim half a dozen lengths, she suddenly lost her nerve again. One day, out of the blue, she had a panic attack and started shaking and shivering with fear. Determined not to let this defeat her after she'd come so far, Helen went to a hypnotherapist who gave her subconscious suggestions to help her overcome her fears. She was soon back in the water with renewed assurance. And now Helen can swim 64 lengths of her local swimming pool, which is much more than a mile. To celebrate her success she hired the pool at her local sports centre for a birthday celebration. Helen shows the rest of us anything can be achieved if you want to do it badly enough.  Mark the best choice           4. How did Helen's family react to her repeated efforts to learn to swim?





As the water reached her waist Helen felt herself starting to panic. It was ridiculous, she told herself. Here she was a fully grown woman wearing armbands and a buoyancy aid around her waist and grasping a float. But she was still terrified of water. At 43, and married with two children, Helen was deeply ashamed of the fact she couldn't swim. She hadn't had swimming lessons at school as there had been no facilities. As she'd got older, her natural distrust of water turned into a phobia. "I was okay as long as my feet were touching the bottom, but the moment I floated free, I'd panic. My heart began racing, my stomach would tighten and I couldn't bear anybody near me." In 1975 when she enrolled for lessons at her local swimming pool it was a disaster. The instructor did get her to do a few strokes but she remained absolutely terrified. When her two children - Daniel, now 19 and Laura, 17 - were young, Helen tried again but her progress was slow and she soon gave in, thinking there was no point carrying on. And that was exactly how things would have stayed if it hadn't been for the Splash school of swimming in Leeds, near Helen's home. When one of the school's leaflets dropped through her letterbox one day last March, Helen was inspired to give swimming one more go. "In the past, whenever I said I was starting lessons the whole family would say "Oh no, not again" so this time I didn't tell anybody. I just phoned up Splash and booked a course." At first Helen was as scared as ever but gradually, with the teacher's help, she began to make progress. The school taught Helen as part of a small group and the instructors stayed in the water with her. They were very patient and that was what she needed. Other instructors at other schools had bullied her and so she'd become discouraged. At Splash, however, they were very understanding. After a few months, Helen was able to take off the armbands and started going to another class at her local sports centre. Soon she could swim a whole length of the swimming pool. Then, just when things were looking up and Helen was able to swim half a dozen lengths, she suddenly lost her nerve again. One day, out of the blue, she had a panic attack and started shaking and shivering with fear. Determined not to let this defeat her after she'd come so far, Helen went to a hypnotherapist who gave her subconscious suggestions to help her overcome her fears. She was soon back in the water with renewed assurance. And now Helen can swim 64 lengths of her local swimming pool, which is much more than a mile. To celebrate her success she hired the pool at her local sports centre for a birthday celebration. Helen shows the rest of us anything can be achieved if you want to do it badly enough.  Mark the best choice           5. At the Splash school the instructors __________.







Leave a Reply