KPDS SINAV SORULARI

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KPDS SINAV SORULARI

 

When prehistoric man returned home from a hunt, he was almost certainly asked the question we would like to ask today: “What happened?” Quite possibly, he replied in a factual manner, providing a short report of the land covered, the number of animals spotted, and the results. His face-to-face communication was limited only to those within the sight and sound of the speaker. Either because of this or because he thought his communication should be recorded in more permanent form, the caveman eventually began to draw his message, the report of his latest adventurous hunt, on the wall of the cave. This opened up a whole range of possibilities: The wall was there twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. The caveman could go about his other business, whatever that may have been, and stil know that his message was being communicated, for the audience was communicating not with the caveman himself, but with the wall. This was the beginning of mass communication – impersonal communication with a diverse audience that has a limited opportunity to respond – and much was gained from it. According to the passage, the simplest form of mass communication is ----.






When prehistoric man returned home from a hunt, he was almost certainly asked the question we would like to ask today: “What happened?” Quite possibly, he replied in a factual manner, providing a short report of the land covered, the number of animals spotted, and the results. His face-to-face communication was limited only to those within the sight and sound of the speaker. Either because of this or because he thought his communication should be recorded in more permanent form, the caveman eventually began to draw his message, the report of his latest adventurous hunt, on the wall of the cave. This opened up a whole range of possibilities: The wall was there twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. The caveman could go about his other business, whatever that may have been, and stil know that his message was being communicated, for the audience was communicating not with the caveman himself, but with the wall. This was the beginning of mass communication – impersonal communication with a diverse audience that has a limited opportunity to respond – and much was gained from it. It is indicated in the passage that as a result of the caveman’s drawings on the walls ----.  






When prehistoric man returned home from a hunt, he was almost certainly asked the question we would like to ask today: “What happened?” Quite possibly, he replied in a factual manner, providing a short report of the land covered, the number of animals spotted, and the results. His face-to-face communication was limited only to those within the sight and sound of the speaker. Either because of this or because he thought his communication should be recorded in more permanent form, the caveman eventually began to draw his message, the report of his latest adventurous hunt, on the wall of the cave. This opened up a whole range of possibilities: The wall was there twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. The caveman could go about his other business, whatever that may have been, and stil know that his message was being communicated, for the audience was communicating not with the caveman himself, but with the wall. This was the beginning of mass communication – impersonal communication with a diverse audience that has a limited opportunity to respond – and much was gained from it. We understand from the passage that mass communication during prehistoric times ----.






When prehistoric man returned home from a hunt, he was almost certainly asked the question we would like to ask today: “What happened?” Quite possibly, he replied in a factual manner, providing a short report of the land covered, the number of animals spotted, and the results. His face-to-face communication was limited only to those within the sight and sound of the speaker. Either because of this or because he thought his communication should be recorded in more permanent form, the caveman eventually began to draw his message, the report of his latest adventurous hunt, on the wall of the cave. This opened up a whole range of possibilities: The wall was there twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. The caveman could go about his other business, whatever that may have been, and stil know that his message was being communicated, for the audience was communicating not with the caveman himself, but with the wall. This was the beginning of mass communication – impersonal communication with a diverse audience that has a limited opportunity to respond – and much was gained from it.   According to the passage, the caveman drew his messages on the cave walls, because    ----.








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