KPDS SINAV SORULARI

Perfect Blog geri dön

KPDS SINAV SORULARI

 

The young child’s reliance on visual impressions is made clear by an experiment on the conservation of number. If two rows of checkers are matched one for one against each other, young children will say, correctly, that the rows have the same number of checkers. If the checkers in one row are brought closer together to form a cluster, 5-year-olds say there are now more checkers in the straight row – even though no checkers have been removed. The visual impression of a long row of checkers overrides the numerical equality that was obvious when the checkers appeared in matching rows. In contrast, 7-year-olds assume that if the number of objects was equal before, it must remain equal. At this age, numerical equality has become more significant than visual impression.   The passage is mainly concerned with ----.






The young child’s reliance on visual impressions is made clear by an experiment on the conservation of number. If two rows of checkers are matched one for one against each other, young children will say, correctly, that the rows have the same number of checkers. If the checkers in one row are brought closer together to form a cluster, 5-year-olds say there are now more checkers in the straight row – even though no checkers have been removed. The visual impression of a long row of checkers overrides the numerical equality that was obvious when the checkers appeared in matching rows. In contrast, 7-year-olds assume that if the number of objects was equal before, it must remain equal. At this age, numerical equality has become more significant than visual impression.   It can be inferred from the passage that, while very small children depend more on what they see to form a concept of their environment, older children ----.






The young child’s reliance on visual impressions is made clear by an experiment on the conservation of number. If two rows of checkers are matched one for one against each other, young children will say, correctly, that the rows have the same number of checkers. If the checkers in one row are brought closer together to form a cluster, 5-year-olds say there are now more checkers in the straight row – even though no checkers have been removed. The visual impression of a long row of checkers overrides the numerical equality that was obvious when the checkers appeared in matching rows. In contrast, 7-year-olds assume that if the number of objects was equal before, it must remain equal. At this age, numerical equality has become more significant than visual impression.   By the words “conservation of number” in the passage is meant ----.  






The young child’s reliance on visual impressions is made clear by an experiment on the conservation of number. If two rows of checkers are matched one for one against each other, young children will say, correctly, that the rows have the same number of checkers. If the checkers in one row are brought closer together to form a cluster, 5-year-olds say there are now more checkers in the straight row – even though no checkers have been removed. The visual impression of a long row of checkers overrides the numerical equality that was obvious when the checkers appeared in matching rows. In contrast, 7-year-olds assume that if the number of objects was equal before, it must remain equal. At this age, numerical equality has become more significant than visual impression.   According to the passage, the reason that 5- yearolds say that there are more checkers in a straight row than in a cluster with the same number is that they ----.








Bu gönderiyi paylaş

Bir Cevap Yazın

E-posta hesabınız yayımlanmayacak. Gerekli alanlar * ile işaretlenmişlerdir

Perfect Blog geri dön
İletişim Formu
Gönder